British Comedy Guide

List of companies to send scripts to Page 9

Avatar

sootyj

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 3:40pm
  • England
  • 51,287 posts

I kinda wanted Snape to kill Harry and bury him some where.

Voldemort is a bit rubbish as villains go.

But Snape and Hermione doing a Natural Born Killers with magic would be cool.

Avatar

Aaron

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 3:47pm [Edited]
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,556 posts
Quote: Timbo @ August 15 2008, 11:35 AM BST

Sorry that is complete nonsense. Only writers care if jokes are obvious? Bollocks.


So thaaaaaat's why After You've Gone, My Family, and My Hero, Two Pints, and everything else which is hated around here, were such utter failures! Yes, I get you now! Rolling eyes

Quote: Timbo @ August 15 2008, 11:35 AM BST

But adults should have the insight to recognise that they are muggles, who have not been born into a world of privilege.


So what?

Quote: Timbo @ August 15 2008, 11:39 AM BST

I actually think it was the kids themselves who gave the craze its momentum.


Well something does have to have an audience in order for it to become popular, no matter what any merchandise or media machine may do. But the latter fuelled it, and kept it alive and sustained.

Avatar

Aaron

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 3:48pm [Edited]
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,556 posts
Quote: Griff @ August 15 2008, 11:47 AM BST

To be fair, everyone around here hates Lab Rats too.


But that's not because of the jokes. It's just shit.

There are some constants in human life which cannot be argued. ;)

Avatar

Finck

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 3:51pm
  • Manchester, England
  • 3,485 posts
Quote: Timbo @ August 15 2008, 11:35 AM BST

But adults should have the insight to recognise that they are muggles, who have not been born into a world of privilege.

I always thought the books were saying the exact opposite. Namely, that even the existence of magic doesn't change the human condition and that being born privileged doesn't mean anything at all or rather that the believe in being born privileged (or "better") is the cause of conflicts.

I read the books as being critical of technology and society and thought they were transporting some moral statements than can be universally acctepted without being patronising. But that's just stupid me reading children's books, I guess.

AvatarBCG Supporter

Tursiops

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 3:54pm [Edited]
  • Welwyn Garden City, England
  • 9,788 posts
Quote: Aaron @ August 15 2008, 11:47 AM BST

So thaaaaaat's why After You've Gone, My Family, and My Hero, Two Pints, and everything else which are hated around here, were such utter failures! Yes, I get you now! Rolling eyes


Oddly enough, I do not think any of those shows are really loved, in the same way that genuinely good mainstream shows such as Porridge or Rising Damp are loved. And it is certainly not only writers and critics who actively dislike them.

Quote: Aaron @ August 15 2008, 11:47 AM BST

So what?


For this type of fiction the reader should be able to identify with the protagonist. It seems odd to identify with someone who looks down on you.

Avatar

Aaron

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 3:57pm
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,556 posts
Quote: Finck @ August 15 2008, 11:51 AM BST

I always thought the books were saying the exact opposite. Namely, that even the existence of magic doesn't change the human condition and that being born privileged doesn't mean anything at all or rather that the believe in being born privileged (or "better") is the cause of conflicts.

I read the books as being critical of technology and society and thought they were transporting some moral statements than can be universally acctepted without being patronising. But that's just stupid me reading children's books, I guess.


Well said. The wizarding world had its own privileged section of its society. And the Malfoys did so well for themselves. Laughing out loud

If anything, one could argue that it's saying that a world of privilege is a hindrance. The 'Muggles' weren't pissing themselves with fright over the prospect of Tom Marvolo Riddle.

Avatar

Marc P

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 3:57pm
  • England
  • 17,698 posts
Quote: Griff @ August 15 2008, 11:47 AM BST

To be fair, everyone around here hates Lab Rats too.

I didnt!

Perhaps I am easily pleased but I can't say I hate it. The sort of stuff that comes and goes and was maybe a bit of a curates egg.

Avatar

Aaron

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 3:59pm [Edited]
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,556 posts
Quote: Timbo @ August 15 2008, 11:54 AM BST

For this type of fiction the reader should be able to identify with the protagonist. It seems odd to identify with someone who looks down on you.


Have you actually read a single one of the books? That statement could not be more of a load of utter bollocks if you tried.

AvatarBCG Supporter

Tursiops

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 4:00pm
  • Welwyn Garden City, England
  • 9,788 posts
Quote: Finck @ August 15 2008, 11:51 AM BST

I always thought the books were saying the exact opposite. Namely, that even the existence of magic doesn't change the human condition and that being born privileged doesn't mean anything at all or rather that the believe in being born privileged (or "better") is the cause of conflicts.

I read the books as being critical of technology and society and thought they were transporting some moral statements than can be universally acctepted without being patronising. But that's just stupid me reading children's books, I guess.

In fairness I have only read the first one and been forced to sit through a couple of the films, which always simplify, so it is possible that in the later books the theme may have been subverted. But I just saw children born into privilege going to an exclusive public school, where they referred to lesser mortals as "muggles".

Avatar

Aaron

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 4:02pm
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,556 posts
Quote: Timbo @ August 15 2008, 12:00 PM BST

In fairness I have only read the first one and been forced to sit through a couple of the films, which always simplify, so it is possible that in the later books the theme may have been subverted. But I just saw children born into privilege going to an exclusive public school, where they referred to lesser mortals as "muggles".


Is Timbo a class warrior?

AvatarBCG Supporter

Tursiops

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 4:04pm [Edited]
  • Welwyn Garden City, England
  • 9,788 posts
Quote: Griff @ August 15 2008, 12:00 PM BST

I haven't even seen Lab Rats, I'm just copying what everyone else said.


I don't dislike it. It has jokes. It is an unfashionable opinion on here, but I think these are important in a sitcom.

Quote: Griff @ August 15 2008, 12:03 PM BST Image


Now that is a public school novel worth reading.

Avatar

Marc P

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 4:07pm
  • England
  • 17,698 posts

I am sure this isn't off topic, but what do you make of 'The Thief Lord' and Inkheart' by your own Cernelia Funke, Finck.

I rather enjoyed them. :)

AvatarBCG Supporter

Tursiops

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 4:09pm
  • Welwyn Garden City, England
  • 9,788 posts
Quote: Griff @ August 15 2008, 12:05 PM BST

Who's said sitcoms don't need jokes?

I am naming no-names, but from discussions in the forums I sometimes get the impression that gags are considered by some at best a necessary evil.

Avatar

Marc P

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 4:11pm
  • England
  • 17,698 posts
Quote: Griff @ August 15 2008, 12:05 PM BST

Who's said sitcoms don't need jokes?

BTW JK Rowling nicked the name "Hogwarts" from the Molesworth books and has never acknowledged it.

When was Molesworth first published Griff?

AvatarBCG Supporter

Tursiops

  • Friday 15th August 2008, 4:13pm
  • Welwyn Garden City, England
  • 9,788 posts
Quote: Aaron @ August 15 2008, 11:57 AM BST


If anything, one could argue that it's saying that a world of privilege is a hindrance. The 'Muggles' weren't pissing themselves with fright over the prospect of Tom Marvolo Riddle.

The burden of responsibility is the argument always used to justify privilege.

As for the Malfoys, snobs always have bigger snobs to look down on them.