Yes Minister Page 4

Yes Minister. James Hacker (Paul Eddington). Copyright: BBC.

Yes Minister

Political satire in which well-meaning MP Jim Hacker has a fast introduction to the world of Whitehall and must then struggle against the Civil Service

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Aaron

  • Sunday 12th April 2009, 4:54am
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,569 posts

Correct.

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sardines

  • Tuesday 14th April 2009, 5:15am
  • Ireland
  • 265 posts
Quote: Kenneth @ April 11 2009, 11:56 PM BST

Studio audience, not laugh-track, I think.


Ohh thanks for that.

A lot easier to forgive the general public than the makers of the show for it.

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Maurice Minor

  • Tuesday 14th April 2009, 1:16pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 478 posts

I loved this show. The transition from Minister to Prime Minister was very good. Very well done and an excellent way of moving it all on a bit; nicely twisting the dynamic a little.

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youngian

  • Tuesday 20th October 2009, 4:45pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 1,727 posts
Quote: Aaron @ March 24 2009, 10:18 PM BST

Blimey. No, beyond the slight intellectual level inherent with the setting, it's not stuffy in the slightest. Very accessible IMO. It's essentially the struggle between someone who has power, and someone who has very little power but thinks that he should - which is another pretty universal premise really.

Anyway, if you're only one episode in, you have a real treat ahead of you. :)


I met a bloke about 10 years ago who wrote press releases for BBC's international sales department who told me it was one of their most widely distributed programmes because everyone around the world understood political manoeuvring and corruption.

Another great facet of the writing was the change in the power balance as Hacker learned the ropes and became wiser to Humphrey's weasel ways.

Even compared with the brilliant and more contemporary the Thick of It, Yes Minister/PM has lost none of its verve or relevancy and continues to keeps being vindicated. For example banking executives after last year's collapse managed to sound dead ringers for Sir Humphrey's hapless pal Sir Desmond Glazebook (Richard Vernon), who ran some grand financial institution but understood nothing, including any of the figures in the FT he carried around for show.

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Alfred J Kipper

  • Tuesday 20th October 2009, 11:45pm [Edited]
  • Aldershot, England
  • 6,124 posts

I'm not sure if it's been asked already but was there a US version of this show? I have a very vague idea there was, but wondered if it was any good or not. I know the Americans liked our version, so surely they bought rights and had a go at their own?

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Ian Wolf

  • Wednesday 21st October 2009, 11:35am
  • Stockton-on-Tees, England
  • 2,837 posts

I don't think there has been.

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Aaron

  • Wednesday 21st October 2009, 9:32pm
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,569 posts
Quote: Alfred J Kipper @ October 20 2009, 7:45 PM BST

I'm not sure if it's been asked already but was there a US version of this show? I have a very vague idea there was, but wondered if it was any good or not. I know the Americans liked our version, so surely they bought rights and had a go at their own?


Not impossible that it wasn't piloted, but I've never read of a broadcast one.

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Oldrocker

  • Thursday 22nd October 2009, 4:31am
  • Near my beloved Black Country in Wolverhampton, England
  • 13,416 posts
Quote: Alfred J Kipper @ October 20 2009, 7:45 PM BST

I'm not sure if it's been asked already but was there a US version of this show? I have a very vague idea there was, but wondered if it was any good or not. I know the Americans liked our version, so surely they bought rights and had a go at their own?


God, I hope not !

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chipolata

  • Thursday 22nd October 2009, 3:39pm
  • England
  • 30,076 posts

Not sure if his death has been mentioned yet, but Ludovic Kennedy deserves a mention in this thread. He played himself in a number of episodes, and was referred to as "Ludo" by Jim Hacker.

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chipolata

  • Thursday 18th February 2010, 2:41pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 30,076 posts
Quote: john lucas 101 @ February 18 2010, 2:32 PM GMT

After Steptoe, 'Allo 'Allo! and Porridge on the stage, next is Yes, Prime Minister, with some interesting casting for the Thick Of It fans: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/theatre/theatre-features/7258497/Yes-Prime-Minister-on-stage.html

F**k me, they look old! The show lends itself to the stage, although it would be interesting to see how it stands up in today's more brutal post Thick Of It world. David Haig would be good, though.

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youngian

  • Thursday 18th February 2010, 3:14pm
  • England
  • 1,727 posts

The Thick of It is going to be an elephant in the room which will make this a tricky venture but I hope they pull this off as it is still one of the finest sit-coms ever.

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Aaron

  • Thursday 18th February 2010, 10:46pm
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,569 posts

The New Statesman worked well, although that did have the luxury of the original cast.

I look forward to booking my tickets.

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Oldrocker

  • Friday 19th February 2010, 1:12am
  • Near my beloved Black Country in Wolverhampton, England
  • 13,416 posts
Quote: youngian @ February 18 2010, 3:14 PM GMT

elephant in the room


Ner ner ner ner ner ner

Alert !

Silly management speak !

Time to think outside the box and gather some low hanging fruit because we are where we are !