Two Doors Down. Image shows from L to R: Beth (Arabella Weir), Eric (Alex Norton). Copyright: BBC
Two Doors Down

Two Doors Down

  • TV sitcom
  • BBC Two / BBC One
  • 2013 - 2023
  • 47 episodes (7 series)

Comedy focused on Latimer Crescent residents Eric and Beth Baird, plus their neighbours and immediate family. Stars Arabella Weir, Alex Norton, Doon Mackichan, Jonathan Watson, Elaine C. Smith and more.

  • JustWatch Streaming rank this week: 1,016

Episode menu

Series 1, Episode 1

Two Doors Down. Image shows from L to R: Beth (Arabella Weir), Jaz (Harki Bhambra), Ian (Jamie Quinn), Sophie (Sharon Rooney). Copyright: BBC
When Eric raids the freezer after coming in from a night out, he leaves the door open and all the food inside defrosts. Beth decides to cook everything at once and invite Cathy, Colin, Ian, Jaz, Christine and Sophie over to eat it all. Everything goes well until Cathy urges Colin to go next door and get something out of their freezer to replace the defrosted food, a whole Scottish salmon.

Preview clips

Further details

Eric leaves the freezer door open, leading to a huge puddle of chilly recrimination for everyone.

Faced with chucking out a freezer full of defrosted food, Beth decides there's only one thing for it - cook everything and invite Cathy, Colin, Christine, Sophie, Ian and Jaz over to eat the lot. Everything goes well until Cathy urges Colin to pop home and get something out of their double-door extra-large freezer to replace the defrosted food - a whole Scottish salmon. Pity it won't fit into Beth's run-of-the-mill freezer.

As the food fiasco continues, temperatures begin to rise in Beth's kitchen and it's only a matter of time before this neighbourly get together leaves a bad taste in everyone's mouth.

Broadcast details

Date
Friday 1st April 2016
Time
10pm
Channel
BBC Two
Length
30 minutes

Repeats

Show past repeats

Date Time Channel
Friday 1st April 2016 11:05pm BBC2 Wales
Wednesday 29th May 2019 11:10pm BBC Scotland
Tuesday 4th June 2019 2:00am Gold
Tuesday 4th June 2019 11:40pm Gold
Friday 26th July 2019 12:15am Gold
Wednesday 28th August 2019 2:15am Gold
Thursday 29th August 2019 1:40am Gold
Friday 6th September 2019 3:10am Gold
Friday 15th November 2019 2:20am Gold
Thursday 21st November 2019 10:00pm BBC Scotland
Saturday 23rd November 2019 9:30pm BBC Scotland
Sunday 24th November 2019 1:55am Gold

Cast & crew

Cast
Arabella Weir Beth
Alex Norton Eric
Doon Mackichan Cathy
Jonathan Watson Colin
Elaine C. Smith Christine
Jamie Quinn Ian
Sharon Rooney Sophie
Harki Bhambra Jaz
Guest cast
Liam McLeod Sports Commentary (Voice)
Writing team
Simon Carlyle Writer
Gregor Sharp Writer
Production team
Simon Hynd Director
Catherine Gosling Fuller Producer
Steven Canny Executive Producer
Ewan Angus Executive Producer
Myfanwy Moore Executive Producer
Calum Ross Editor
Greg Shaw Production Designer
Nathaniel Rateliff Composer

Video

Frozen food dinner party

Cathy and Colin have come round to help Beth sort through the contents of her freezer.

Featuring: Doon Mackichan (Cathy), Jonathan Watson (Colin) & Arabella Weir (Beth).

Press

Two Doors Down reunites us with Eric and Beth (Alex Norton and Arabella Weir) a middle-aged Glaswegian couple who are part of a close-knit neighbourhood. From the opening instalment I got the impression that each episode of the series will be based around one crisis or another that the neighbours have with the rest of the street getting involved in the process. This time it was Eric's late night hunt for oven chips that led to Beth's freezer being left open overnight and completely ruining all the food that was in it. This prompts Beth to invite friends and family around to sample a buffet that includes everything from vegetable pakoras to apple pie. Drafted into help in the kitchen is Cathy (Doon Mackichan), Beth's neighbour who can't help but pass comment on how big her freezer is in comparison to her friend's and how it pains to even help put stuff in the oven. The other story running throughout this first episode is that of Eric and Beth's son Ian (Jamie Quinn) who is about to move in with his boyfriend Jaz (Harki Bhambra) but isn't keen to tell his parents just yet. Whilst Two Doors Down wasn't laugh-out-loud funny what I enjoyed about the show was the way in which you identified with at least one of the characters. I feel most people know an Eric or a Beth or a Cathy and therefore it's not a hard task to imagine these people living on your street. The central gag of the freezer breaking down is an equally realistic conceit and the scene in which Beth and Cathy were trying to work out what went in the oven and what temperature was very funny indeed. I feel that the sitcom's creator Simon Carlyle has a very good ear for everyday dialogue and that's true of both Two Doors Down and his work on Boy Meets Girl. The cast are equally on form with Norton, Weir and Mackichan the highlights of a strong ensemble who were all trying their best to make the show work. My only criticism of Two Doors Down at this early stage is that the supporting characters don't feel as well-realised as the main cast which is true of Ian and Jaz as well as Sharon Rooney's Sophie who doesn't get to do much at all. Overall I would say that Two Doors Down is a promising and likeable sitcom that contains believable characters and situations which is something I couldn't say a lot of other contemporary comedies.

Matt, The Custard TV, 2nd April 2016

Review: Two Doors Down, BBC Two

This being sitcomland, nobody is allowed to be entirely normal.

Veronica Lee, The Arts Desk, 2nd April 2016

Two Doors Down returns for a full series following its one-off 2014 special, rejoining the residents of Latimer Crescent in Glasgow. Eric (Alex Norton) comes home drunk from the pub, leaving the freezer door ajar after bingeing on oven chips. To avoid having to throw away the food, furious Beth (Arabella Weir, her Scottish accent still a work in progress, it would seem) decides to invite the neighbours round to help polish it off. It's a mundane set-up, not helped by a woeful lack of laughs.

Ben Arnold, The Guardian, 1st April 2016

Share this page