Rising Damp Page 2

Rising Damp. Image shows from L to R: Ruth Jones (Frances de la Tour), Rupert Rigsby (Leonard Rossiter), Philip Smith (Don Warrington). Copyright: Yorkshire Television.

Rising Damp

Rupert Rigsby is the grubby landlord of a seedy boarding house. His put-upon tenants include students Philip and Alan, and the glamorous Miss Jones

Avatar

Dene Kernohan

  • Thursday 5th March 2009, 4:00pm [Edited]
  • Northern Ireland
  • 103 posts
Quote: Aaron @ March 4 2009, 7:10 PM GMT

It's certainly not somewhere that a significant amount of people are aware of. If I didn't have a TV guide on my computer then I certainly wouldn't know about it. Not exactly publicised much, is it?

ITV3 is one of the most popular non-terrestrial channels, along with ITV2 (and BBC Three).

My point was that you can fairly easily track down 'Rising Damp' if you so wish, which can't be said for a lot of other excellent sitcoms of the past.

Avatar

Afinkawan

  • Thursday 5th March 2009, 4:08pm
  • Huddersfield, England
  • 2,302 posts

It's not as if repeats of Fawlty Towers get much advertising time either!

Anyway, have this:

Image

Miss Jones and Alan came out a bit shonky but it looks like Leonard Rossiter would have made an excellent Han Solo.

Avatar

chipolata

  • Thursday 5th March 2009, 4:21pm
  • England
  • 30,176 posts

I always think of Aaron as a bit of a Rigsby. He thinks he's one class but is quite clearly another.

Avatar

Aaron

  • Thursday 5th March 2009, 5:22pm
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,829 posts

Aaron has no illusions as to what class he's in; he merely aspires to be higher.

Avatar

Ronnie Anderson

  • Friday 6th March 2009, 3:12am [Edited]
  • England
  • 587 posts

I do feel that Lenard Rossiter doesn't get enough appreciation for how much better he was than any other sitcom actor. Hopefully with the credit crunch ITV might realise that they have no choice but to reuse their classic back catalogue and so give an airing on ITV1 so maybe it can gain a bigger cult audience. Some of the jokes are outdated but nontheless the themes and the character of Rigsby are timeless hence it is still more relevant to today than ninety percent of modern day sitcoms.

Avatar

Morrace

  • Friday 6th March 2009, 4:58am [Edited]
  • England
  • 2,727 posts

I was lucky enough to see the original stage play at the Hampstead Theatre Club.

'The Banana Box'

17 May - 16 June 1973, Hampstead Theatre Club, London
Rooksby: Leonard Rossiter
Noel Parker: Paul Jones (ex-Manfred Mann group)
Philip Smith: Don Warrington (Kenco ads now!)
Ruth Jones: Frances de la Tour
Lucy: Elizabeth Adare (ex-'The Tomorrow People')

For the TV series:

'Rooksby' - became 'Rigsby'
'Noel Parker' / Paul Jones - became 'Alan Moore' /Richard Beckinsale.

One of the funniest stage plays I've ever seen.

http://www.leonardrossiter.com/risingdamp/StoryPlay.html

Image

Avatar

Aaron

  • Friday 6th March 2009, 5:25am
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,829 posts
Quote: Morrace @ March 5 2009, 11:58 PM GMT

I was lucky enough to see the original stage play at the Hampstead Theatre Club.


Oh you l- ...!

*shakes fist in jealousy*

Avatar

vim1

  • Sunday 8th March 2009, 1:08am
  • England
  • 35 posts

Where was the house in the TV series? I do not believe that a town or city was ever mentioned, although Rigsby did mention the wind coming straight off the Pennines.

The house in the feature film, although no location was mentioned was in London. You can tell this as there is a newsagents in the film advertising the Evening Standard.

Somebody did a floor plan for the flat in Only Fools and Horses. Has one ever been done for Rising Damp?

There were the two students on the top floor.

Miss Jones directly below.

Then was it Rigsby on the ground floor?

What floor was the wrestler and the not so successful actor on?

The feature film which used a real house had sinks by the stairways. This was common in a lot of multiple occupancy properties and disappeared around a similar time as the outside toilet.

Avatar

Dave

  • Sunday 8th March 2009, 5:39am [Edited]
  • United Kingdom
  • 1,172 posts
Quote: vim1 @ March 7 2009, 8:08 PM GMT

Where was the house in the TV series? I do not believe that a town or city was ever mentioned, although Rigsby did mention the wind coming straight off the Pennines.

The house in the feature film, although no location was mentioned was in London. You can tell this as there is a newsagents in the film advertising the Evening Standard.

Somebody did a floor plan for the flat in Only Fools and Horses. Has one ever been done for Rising Damp?

There were the two students on the top floor.

Miss Jones directly below.

Then was it Rigsby on the ground floor?

What floor was the wrestler and the not so successful actor on?

The feature film which used a real house had sinks by the stairways. This was common in a lot of multiple occupancy properties and disappeared around a similar time as the outside toilet.


The location is a university town in or near Yorkshire, probably Leeds or Sheffield. Rigsy is on the ground floor (as seen in the "Great Expectations" episode) and Miss Jones is on the second floor. Spooner the Wrestler's room was on the second floor too, and as the room looked the same when Peter Bowles' character Hilary was there, I would say it was the same one. The room was seen again in the episodes as Maraylyn's room in "Fawcett's Python" and Osbourne's room in "Under the Influence". Seymour stayed in a room opposite Alan and Phillip's in the episode "The Perfect Gentlemen".

And Rigsy said the wind was coming from the Urals, not the Pennines.

Avatar

Ronnie Anderson

  • Sunday 8th March 2009, 4:43pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 587 posts

I'm sure it was set in Birmingham. Not just because of Beckinsale and Rossiter's accents but I think there was some reference to it in one of the scripts.

I wonder if the script to the original stage play is available anywhere. A long shot, I guess.

Edited by Aaron.

Avatar

Morrace

  • Sunday 8th March 2009, 4:54pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 2,727 posts
Quote: Ronnie Anderson @ March 8 2009, 12:43 PM GMT

I wonder if the script to the original stage play is available anywhere. A long shot, I guess.


Product artwork - buy at Amazon
Buy at Amazon

Avatar

vim1

  • Sunday 8th March 2009, 10:50pm
  • England
  • 35 posts

Something else that not many people may be aware of was concerning the door in the credits.

The door handle appears to have been removed, the key hole blocked up and something placed against the hinges, all of which to prevent opening.

Around the time that Rising Damp was first transmitted I remember seeing an item on Nationwide about a family who were trying to get re housed from a very old property. The environmental health department had confirmed it was a slum by condemning one of the rooms as unfit for human habitation. The door had been sealed in the same way as in Rising Damp.

Why they chose just the one room I do not know, I was in short trousers back then.

Avatar

neil steptoe

  • Monday 9th March 2009, 12:58am [Edited]
  • England
  • 5 posts

I don't agree with the idea of Rising Damp being set in Birmingham, I always felt it was more likely so be set in Manchester. There was mention of a train passing by in one episode of which Alan said it was from Macclesfield, perhaps a train buff could throw some light on the question?

Avatar

Aaron

  • Monday 9th March 2009, 1:21am
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,829 posts

Unless I'm very much mistaken, Macclesfield is between Birmingham and Manchester so it really could be either!

(Although far closer to Manchester, so more likely.)

Avatar

vim1

  • Monday 9th March 2009, 2:36am
  • England
  • 35 posts

I read that there was a Dutch version made shortly after the original set in a house in a part of Amsterdam that had seen better days.

If this is true, I wonder if any record of it still exists.