This Way Up Page 2

This Way Up. Aine (Aisling Bea). Copyright: Merman.

This Way Up

Aisling Bea writes and stars in this comedy about a woman recovering from a nervous breakdown

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Rood Eye

  • Friday 23rd August 2019, 9:26am [Edited]
  • England
  • 2,570 posts

Aisling's character is Aine (pronounced "Onya") - a name, I imagine, rarely given to children by parents whose surname is "Bike".

It means "radiance" in Gaelic/Irish but, in French, it means "groin".

Language, eh?

It's a minefield, I tell you! Laughing out loud

Off-topic post by Definitely Tarby on Fri 23rd Aug 2019, 10:53

My Irish cousin is called Aine and pronounced onya. She lives in the town where Braveheart was filmed and was an extra.

Another one of those same time tomorrow.

Off-topic post by Chappers on Fri 23rd Aug 2019, 22:22

Why can't Irish people learn to spell?

Off-topic post by Definitely Tarby on Fri 23rd Aug 2019, 22:31
Quote: Chappers @ 23rd August 2019, 10:22 PM

Why can't Irish people learn to spell?

I don't know why can't Irish people learn how to spell? [drum roll]

Off-topic post by Billy Bunter on Fri 23rd Aug 2019, 22:41
Quote: Definitely Tarby @ 23rd August 2019, 10:31 PM

I don't know why can't Irish people learn how to spell? (drum roll)

Because they write the letters down in Eire?

Off-topic post by Rood Eye on Sat 24th Aug 2019, 08:19

Why can't the Irish learn how to spell?

That's a question that both Aisling Bea and Aine in This Way Up would delight in answering: but what is the answer?

As I ponder the question, I hear The Ghost of Comedy Past whisper "Because they're a bunch of Eire-heads!"

I immediately retort "Get thee behind me, Ghost of Comedy Past!" and I continue to ponder.

It soon occurs to me that the Irish might prefer an Aisling Bea to a spelling bee but I quickly put that from my mind.

I then realise that the Irish are using all the right letters but not necessarily in the right order - but why?

And then it hits me: both the Americans and the Irish do know how to spell but they've rejected conventional English spellings simply to wind us up.

It's all to do with tea and potatoes.

Yes, I'm Happy AF with that one. Laughing out loud

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Lazzard

  • Monday 2nd September 2019, 10:20am
  • Ludlow, England
  • 4,476 posts

Just catching up with this.
I like it a lot.

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rrr 969

  • Monday 2nd September 2019, 3:52pm
  • Odessa, Ukraine
  • 87 posts

1 more possible A to Q on this page Off-topic.
Bulgarians are one of the few peoples around the world who shake their heads for saying 'yes' and nod for 'no'. Because (Internet, most popular theory): five centuries of Ottoman rule, they nodded to oppressors while actually meaning 'no' in their hearts.

So they (Bulgarians and Irish, as peripheral to empire) are aware of being different and stick to it.

1-4 episodes so far are very good, I hear that sad tone that was omnipresent in Fleabag, but Aine is more funny, likeable, stronger character.

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Chappers

  • Monday 2nd September 2019, 9:52pm
  • Surreyish., England
  • 30,342 posts

The one thing I don't like is the bit where they do a song and dance at the party. You see it in several comedies and I think it's a very lazy way to get a few laughs.

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Rood Eye

  • Monday 2nd September 2019, 10:12pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 2,570 posts
Quote: Chappers @ 2nd September 2019, 9:52 PM

The one thing I don't like is the bit where they do a song and dance at the party. You see it in several comedies and I think it's a very lazy way to get a few laughs.

I remember a scene in The Royle Family in which they were decorating (scraping wallpaper, if I remember correctly) - all done to music and all the moves synchronised.

My first reaction was to think it was bone idle writing technique but I have to say lots of viewers and lots of people on comedy forums thought it was absolutely great. So perhaps it was actually very good comedy writing as it made huge numbers of people laugh?

I feel the same about the singing scene in This Way Up: I didn't like it and my first reaction was to think it lazy but, once again, I'm pretty sure lots of viewers and lots of people on comedy forums thought it was wonderful. So, once again, perhaps Aisling was right on point?

It's a funny thing, comedy. :S

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rrr 969

  • Friday 6th September 2019, 8:43am
  • Odessa, Ukraine
  • 87 posts

s01 is excellent in my opinion, she "reads vibes (e6)" and she conveys them. Very talented, truthful, human, long expected series.

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Chappers

  • Friday 6th September 2019, 8:48pm
  • Surreyish., England
  • 30,342 posts

Aisling is just so naturally funny. Doesn't seem like she's acting at all and who else could joke about tampons and periods and make it seem funny?

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Sitcomfan64

  • Saturday 7th September 2019, 2:15pm
  • England
  • 550 posts

Finally binged this, a wonderful series. Aisling just seems like such a lovely person, and has that rare natural charisma that immediately endears. For being billed as a comedy drama, it has more laughs per pound than a lot of other stuff I've watched recently, and the more melancholy scenes slot right in because the characters are so well developed.

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Rood Eye

  • Wednesday 11th September 2019, 11:08pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 2,570 posts
Quote: Chappers @ 6th September 2019, 8:48 PM

who else could joke about tampons and periods and make it seem funny?

Catherine Cookson was always writing period pieces without getting many laughs so it's clearly a more difficult enterprise than it seems.

It's a popular subject in some quarters, however: I once knew a man who owned a well-known club in Manchester and he told me every woman comedian he ever employed talked about almost nothing else.

Mind you, he also said none of them was even remotely funny so it appears Aisling does indeed have a genuine talent for comedy, having succeeded where so many of her fore-runners have failed.

I've said it before and I'll say it again: she and Kathryn Ryan are the top two women stand-up comedians in Britain - by a very, very long way.

I've also pointed out that neither she nor Kathryn is British.

Still, we can always look back on the glory days of British female stand-up comedy: Victoria Wood - there was never a more talented female stand-up before her and there hasn't been one since.

So take that, Aisling and Kathryn! Laughing out loud

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Chappers

  • Thursday 19th September 2019, 10:18pm
  • Surreyish., England
  • 30,342 posts

I'm just watching the last part on catch-up. There was one line that confused me and I wasn't sure if it was supposed to be clever or not.

"Etienne's English had gotten so good."