Puns/one-liners

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abfc bjk

  • Sunday 2nd January 2011, 7:58pm [Edited]
  • Turkey
  • 58 posts

What're everyone's opinions towards one-liners and puns?

I don't mean things like:
"I had a boiled egg, it was egg-sellent", but more thought out punchlines and a play on a phrase. The same style as the likes of Milton Jones:
"My grand-dad covered his back with butter, after that he went downhill very quickly."

Stewart Francis
"I was sitting in traffic earlier, inevitably I got run over."

Steven Wright
"I spilt spot remover on my dog, now he's gone."

Of course the very memorable from Airplane!:
"Surely you can't be serious?"
"I am serious, and don't call me Shirley."

There are several comedians, (just thought of Tim Vine), TV shows (Not Going Out) and movies (Airplane!) that are very successful that use puns of the sort pretty much all the time, yet some people think it's "the lowest form of wit".

Thoughts?

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Lassoon

  • Sunday 2nd January 2011, 9:07pm
  • England
  • 214 posts

The thing about puns for me is, whether I like them or not depends on the pun. Some are shit, others are genius. But generally I like them.

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His Own Devices

  • Monday 3rd January 2011, 1:22am [Edited]
  • England
  • 126 posts

I like the type of one-liners that panel show hosts do, such as:

Charlie Brooker on You Have Been Watching: "David Caruser is so wooden that he auditioned for a part in the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe as the Wardrobe. But he couldn't play that part because it requried him to open up a bit."

John Sergent on Argumental: "I'm quite found of alternative medicine. What's that one called again with the needles? Oh yes, herorine."

And Angus Deayton on Would I Lie To You?: "If you look up the definition of lie online it says it's a type of deception in the form of an untruthful statement. Thats rich coming from Wikipedia."

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zooo

  • Monday 3rd January 2011, 1:33am
  • United Kingdom
  • 69,186 posts

I do love Charlie Brooker's insults. They're inspiring!

As Lassoon said, if they're good I like them, if not I don't. But I certainly don't have a problem with them in general.

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Bomsh

  • Monday 3rd January 2011, 1:40am
  • England
  • 315 posts
Quote: zooo @ January 3 2011, 1:33 AM GMT

As Lassoon said, if they're good I like them, if not I don't. But I certainly don't have a problem with them in general.


Like this.

I like puns when they make me laugh. Is there another way to judge them?

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Steve Sunshine

  • Monday 3rd January 2011, 1:48am [Edited]
  • Dagenham, England
  • 14,523 posts

Speaking of those type of Pun One Liners from the original post

Stewart Francis
"I was sitting in traffic earlier, inevitably I got run over."
Quite funny IMO

Steven Wright
"I spilt spot remover on my dog, now he's gone."
Brilliant IMO

I suppose it's not that difficult to find a phrase that has two meanings and put a couple of ideas together to make a silly pun joke.
But you probably won't be the first person to have had that idea.
But they can be done brilliantly.

Is it the lowest form of wit or the Purest form of Comedy?

*shines Tony Coward symbol into the sky*

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Nogget

  • Monday 3rd January 2011, 8:56am
  • England
  • 6,615 posts
Quote: Steve Sunshine @ January 3 2011, 1:48 AM GMT

Is it the lowest form of wit or the Purest form of Comedy?


In my experience, the best comedy attracts both those opinions.

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Marc P

  • Monday 3rd January 2011, 10:02am
  • England
  • 17,698 posts

A pun? My word it's good.

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Tony Cowards

  • Monday 3rd January 2011, 10:17am
  • Wiltshire, England
  • 1,762 posts

Don't get me started on the "puns are the lowest form of wit" argument!

Yes, it's SOOOOO much easier to write elaborate and sophisticated pieces of word play which work on several levels and are actually quite beautiful in their simplicity and artistry than to look at something and go "Airline food? What's the deal with that?" or "Does anyone remember Spangles?"

Personally I think Tim Vine, Milton Jones, Gary Delaney, Mitch Hedburg, Steven Wright, Demetri Martin, Bob Monkhouse, Tommy Cooper, etc are proponents of the highest, purest form of stand up comedy, where not a single word is wasted in the pursuit of the laugh.

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JoLaw

  • Monday 3rd January 2011, 11:09am
  • Sunderland, England
  • 132 posts
Quote: Tony Cowards @ January 3 2011, 10:17 AM GMT


Personally I think Tim Vine, Milton Jones, Gary Delaney, Mitch Hedburg, Steven Wright, Demetri Martin, Bob Monkhouse, Tommy Cooper, etc are proponents of the highest, purest form of stand up comedy, where not a single word is wasted in the pursuit of the laugh.


Some of my favourites you've listed there. :D

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Buddy Sorrel

  • Friday 4th February 2011, 11:16am
  • East Anglia, England
  • 55 posts

There are two types of pun; One, the horrible, laboured, disgustingly simple piece of muck that should have its own special bin at the side of the road for disposal and two, the ones I think up.

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lummycorks

  • Friday 4th February 2011, 4:19pm
  • England
  • 43 posts

i love puns and plays on words.

Tommy cooper: "I cleaned out the attic with the wife at the weekend. Dirty, filthy, covered in cobwebs......but she's good with the kids.'

Quote: Tony Cowards @ January 3 2011, 10:17 AM GMT

Personally I think Tim Vine, Milton Jones, Gary Delaney, Mitch Hedburg, Steven Wright, Demetri Martin, Bob Monkhouse, Tommy Cooper, etc are proponents of the highest, purest form of stand up comedy, where not a single word is wasted in the pursuit of the laugh.


I agree with you, but I think Ronnie Barker was the British king of words. His timing and wit was extraordinary.

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UltimateChips

  • Saturday 5th February 2011, 10:10am [Edited]
  • England
  • 12 posts

im a big fan of wit and playing on words. and I agree with you lummyocrks about ronnie barer being the king of words