Chav in OFAH

Only Fools And Horses. Image shows from L to R: Uncle Albert (Buster Merryfield), Del (David Jason), Rodney (Nicholas Lyndhurst). Copyright: BBC.

Only Fools And Horses

Sitcom about two market traders, Del Boy and his brother Rodney

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Tom G

  • Tuesday 15th November 2011, 9:36pm
  • England
  • 453 posts

Hi guys

my girlfriend is doing an OU essay investigating the origins of slang terms.

She is currently looking at "Chav" and I recall it being used in Only Fools and Horses once or twice.

Could anyone tell me exact episodes when it is used? I think Del refers to having "a little chavi" in one episode and Boycie uses it at least once.

As much as I love OFAH, I don't want to go through and watch every episode looking for it!

Thanks in advance

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youngian

  • Tuesday 15th November 2011, 10:04pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 1,727 posts

'Chavi' is Romany for a kid. It's used in Kent.

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Oldrocker

  • Tuesday 15th November 2011, 10:17pm
  • Near my beloved Black Country in Wolverhampton, England
  • 13,416 posts

Just Google

define:chav

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Tom G

  • Tuesday 15th November 2011, 10:21pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 453 posts

Thanks guys, she has researched a lot of its history but wants to cite its usage in OFAH.

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Tim Azure

  • Wednesday 16th November 2011, 11:00am [Edited]
  • Kent, England
  • 2,037 posts
Quote: Tom G @ November 15 2011, 10:21 PM GMT

Thanks guys, she has researched a lot of its history but wants to cite its usage in OFAH.


Not used in OFAH. It only entered the Oxford English Dictionary in 2005 (though it was obviously used before that). It's likely that if it was used in Only Fools it would have been entered much quicker.

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Jinky

  • Wednesday 16th November 2011, 2:33pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 783 posts

Series 6, Epsiode 8 (Little Problems)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuoyvqQ6VAs&feature=related

04:23-04:31 in the above clip.

It's the truth! Marlene's pregnancy is costing me an arm and a leg. She's at a dodgy age for knocking out her first chavvy.


(You'll have to find any others yourself. I used a thing called 'Google', if that's any help)

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Tom G

  • Wednesday 16th November 2011, 3:32pm
  • England
  • 453 posts

That's all I needed. Obviously I had Googled it but had no luck. I bow to your superior searching skills and your unprecedented levels of aggressive sarcasm!

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Vicky Pollard

  • Thursday 17th November 2011, 10:59am [Edited]
  • Belgium
  • 45 posts

Product artwork - buy at Amazon
Buy at Amazon

In this publication you can find about 2 of 3 pages with slang used in OFAH. It might be useful for your friend. I have it at home and I found a few expressions quite interesting!

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Dene Kernohan

  • Thursday 17th November 2011, 12:13pm
  • Northern Ireland
  • 103 posts
Quote: Tim Azure @ November 16 2011, 11:00 AM GMT

Not used in OFAH. It only entered the Oxford English Dictionary in 2005 (though it was obviously used before that). It's likely that if it was used in Only Fools it would have been entered much quicker.


Yes, definitely not. "Chavi", meaning child, has been used in OFAH but "chav" I don't recall, ever.

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catskillz

  • Friday 18th November 2011, 1:51am [Edited]
  • Merseyside, England
  • 3,396 posts

The earliest use of the word on T.V. may have been on an episode of Rising Damp, in the '70s. It's the one in which that bald Brummie bloke arrives at the house, at the end of an episode, after having been away at sea with the Navy. I think his wife had been hiding the fact that she had a baby from Rigsby.

Actually, come to think of it, he might have used the word "charver" instead, which is the word that chav originated from, so I've heard.