PG Wodehouse.

PG Wodehouse

Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie reunite for new film

Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie are reuniting on screen for the first time in more than a decade. Animated film The Canterville Ghost, based on the short story by Oscar Wilde, has been in development for 11 years but is only now in production.

British Comedy Guide, 1st June 2021

Daliso Chaponda joins judging panel for Wodehouse book contest

Daliso Chaponda has joined the judging panel for the 2021 Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for Comic Fiction.

British Comedy Guide, 5th February 2021

PG Wodehouse: India still holds a flame for the author

PG Wodehouse, creator of Jeeves and Bertie Wooster, was the most English novelist imaginable. His comic world was old-fashioned well before he died 45 years ago - crammed with disapproving aunts in hats, eccentric aristocrats and wealthy young men about town getting into scrapes. But he has countless fans around the world - not least in India, a country Wodehouse never set foot in.

Vincent Dowd, BBC, 27th November 2020

Why the funniest books are also the most serious

The fiction that makes us laugh the most is, paradoxically, often the most profound and intelligent, argues John Self. So why isn't it being rewarded?

John Self, BBC, 10th November 2020

Wodehouse Prize: Nina Stibbe wins

The third and final entry in a semi-autobiographical trilogy has netted an author an annual award for the funniest book. Nina Stibbe's Reasons To Be Cheerful clinched the 2019 Wodehouse Prize for Comic Fiction.

BBC, 8th May 2019

Wodehouse Prize: Pig named after Bridget Jones's Baby

A pig is to be named Bridget Jones's Baby after the novel won the Wodehouse Prize for comic fiction.

BBC, 18th May 2017

Paul Murray and Hannah Rothschild win Wodehouse Prize

Authors Paul Murray and Hannah Rothschild have jointly won the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize. The award is given annually to the book considered to best capture the comic spirit of PG Wodehouse.

BBC News, 25th May 2016

Radio Times review

In honour of guest Victoria Coren Mitchell, QI goes off-grid and includes an Only Connect round. The most shocking thing to emerge from this dramatic deviation from the norm is that Alan Davies has never managed to sit through an entire episode of the BBC Two brainiac quiz.

It will surprise no one to learn that Jack Whitehall takes over the proceedings completely for his usual Whitehall farce, though you can't dislike him for it. He's funny, particularly when discussing his dad's disapproval of his son's bromance with host Stephen Fry.

Elsewhere, we learn the connection between PG Wodehouse and Sherlock Holmes - and did you know that a quarter of the people who claim to have read 1984 are lying?

Alison Graham, Radio Times, 17th October 2014