Anusol

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Rood Eye

  • Saturday 4th August 2018, 7:28am
  • England
  • 507 posts

When ex-doctor Harry Hill was asked, "What's the funniest part of the human body?" he replied, "It's undoubtedly the arse".

It's on that basis that I justify bringing up the topic of this well-known medication for the treatment of piles and my only reason for introducing the topic is that, a few moments ago, I saw an advert on TV for this product.

I was amazed that the voice-over pronounced it "AN-yoo-sol" because, ever since I first became aware of its existence many decades ago, I'd assumed the pronunciation was "AY-nuss-ol".

In fact, nothing and nobody in the world is ever going to convince me that when this product was first created, it wasn't pronounced "AY-nuss-ol". It had to be pronounced like that, didn't it? I mean, it just had to be.

I'm sure many BCG readers will have bought this product at some point in their lives or, at least, discussed it with someone else.

How do you pronounce it?

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garyd

  • Saturday 4th August 2018, 9:41am
  • England
  • 702 posts

Saw the ad last night and thought the same!
Missus and I agreed that the product name must have been deliberate and devised by someone with a sharp sense of humour.
The pronunciation in the current ad is, I presume, their way of getting around the ASA regs.
We all know how it should be pronounced!

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Chappers

  • Sunday 5th August 2018, 9:59pm
  • Surreyish., England
  • 29,264 posts

Yer Anus!

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Tommy Griff

  • Tuesday 7th August 2018, 10:11pm
  • Wiltshire, England
  • 268 posts

I feel the same when watching space programmes.

It's Ur-ANUS, not UR-ARN-US for Christ's sake.

Keep it real like Ian Beale.

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Aaron

  • Thursday 9th August 2018, 9:09pm
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 67,999 posts

I think the advert pronunciation is more likely their attempt to rebrand themselves and be seen as serious. Remember when Nestle became Nestlé?

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Alfie J

  • Friday 14th September 2018, 2:25am
  • England
  • 55 posts

I don't know if it's because of an advert in the olden days, but I definitely knew its pronunciation to be as per the current ad. the other way never even occurred to me but makes perfect sense

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Will Cam

  • Friday 14th September 2018, 6:48am
  • England
  • 7,715 posts

Never used it but I'm with Rood Eye, or as I now like to call him "Reed Oye".

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Aaron

  • Friday 14th September 2018, 10:41am
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 67,999 posts
Quote: Will Cam @ 14th September 2018, 6:48 AM

Never used it but I'm with Rood Eye, or as I now like to call him "Reed Oye".

Laughing out loud

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Alfred J Kipper

  • Saturday 15th September 2018, 9:28am
  • Aldershot, England
  • 5,473 posts

As far as I remember being told, there are rules about naming products at least for medicines. You can choose your own brand name but it has to have significance. You can't choose a great catchy name if there is no relation to the product as that would be unfair marketing and may lead to people buying it for another ailment which could be dangerous. There has to be a bold clue for the average customer as to what it is for, as this one has. I believe some of the naffest named products are actually some of the most effective.

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