Ed Reardon's Americanisms

Ed Reardon's Week. Ed Reardon (Christopher Douglas). Copyright: BBC.

Ed Reardon's Week

Radio sitcom following curmudgeonly 50-something writer Ed Reardon, and his flawed attempts to escape poverty via literary success

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Tom Jones

  • Wednesday 11th October 2017, 6:45pm
  • United Kingdom
  • 5 posts

Hi all.
I'm a huge fan of Ed Reardon's week but wonder why the writers use American English. Can anyone explain? Is the show a hit over there?
To me it is jarring to hear British accents talk about 'commercials', 'kid sisters', 'sport jackets', etc. especially since Ed complains about the use of American English in at least one episode. To me it seems a poor decision but what do others think?

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Alfred J Kipper

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 3:05pm [Edited]
  • Aldershot, England
  • 6,358 posts

Hmm, no I'd say commercials has long since prevailed over adverts in English usage, sports jackets were very common here until about the 80s I think. I'd say the term itself has gone out of fashion rather than the garment which you still see about a fair bit. A tweed sports jacket is an essential piece of kit imo, a classic.

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DaButt

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 3:20pm
  • The Lone Star State, United States
  • 13,948 posts
Quote: Tom Jones @ 11th October 2017, 6:45 PM I'm a huge fan of Ed Reardon's week but wonder why the writers use American English. Can anyone explain? Is the show a hit over there?

I've never heard of him, nor the show.

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Paul Wimsett

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 3:33pm
  • Folkestone, United Kingdom
  • 3,394 posts

Do you listen to Radio 4?

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Lazzard

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 3:33pm
  • Ludlow, England
  • 4,872 posts

Radio 4 comedy.
It's about the most "in" programme you can imagine.
If you're not a writer AND English I can't imagine it making any sense.
I love it, but am amazed it has a wider audience - it can only possibly appeal to 'Luvvies'

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Davida

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 3:38pm
  • Oregon USA, United States
  • 502 posts
Quote: DaButt @ 12th October 2017, 3:20 PM I've never heard of him, nor the show.

Same. (But in fairness I'm not really hip to much American media). Kind of don't think it's a hit here though. The Americanisms listed don't seem too terribly America-specific. Do you have any other more glaring examples?

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DaButt

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 3:43pm
  • The Lone Star State, United States
  • 13,948 posts
Quote: Paul Wimsett @ 12th October 2017, 3:33 PM Do you listen to Radio 4?

I haven't listened to an actual radio (other than shortwave/amateur) in more than 20 years. But I do stream 6 Music fairly frequently.

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Alfred J Kipper

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 4:11pm
  • Aldershot, England
  • 6,358 posts
Quote: Lazzard @ 12th October 2017, 3:33 PM Radio 4 comedy.
It's about the most "in" programme you can imagine.
If you're not a writer AND English I can't imagine it making any sense.
I love it, but am amazed it has a wider audience - it can only possibly appeal to 'Luvvies'

Yes exactly the reason I hate it. Catch it usually when I'm driving home, and have the scars on my left hand's knuckles as a legacy. So naturally one tries hard never to miss it. :)

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Tom Jones

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 4:54pm [Edited]
  • United Kingdom
  • 5 posts
Quote: Alfred J Kipper @ 12th October 2017, 3:05 PM Hmm, no I'd say commercials has long since prevailed over adverts in English usage, sports jackets were very common here until about the 80s I think. I'd say the term itself has gone out of fashion rather than the garment which you still see about a fair bit. A tweed sports jacket is an essential piece of kit imo, a classic.

Hmm I beg to differ regarding 'commercials'. I can't recall ever hearing an advert referred to thus by a Brit, but every character in ERW uses the term. I have only ever heard sport jacket and kid sister in America too. There are others like 'wait in line' where we say 'queue', and the characters always refer to Jas's 'movies'. I understand Jas spends time in America but I can't imagine Ed using the American word when he holds American English in disdain.

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Davida

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 5:14pm
  • Oregon USA, United States
  • 502 posts

Maybe he just likes America. I can't imagine why, but some people do, Apparently.

The 'wait in line' one is definitely very American-ish. Never heard a brit say that. I think I've heard some people say 'movies'. Where in America does Jas spend time, do you know?

Maybe the hating American English this is a weird in-joke and he actually likes US English? I don't know. It does seem a little odd. Is it used to humorous effect or is it mainly just a distraction to your British ears? I'm guessing the latter.

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Alfred J Kipper

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 5:36pm
  • Aldershot, England
  • 6,358 posts
Quote: Tom Jones @ 12th October 2017, 4:54 PM Hmm I beg to differ regarding 'commercials'. I can't recall ever hearing an advert referred to thus by a Brit, but every character in ERW uses the term.

Do you watch commercial TV Tom? ie. any other channel than BBC. They say 'commercial break' every 15 mins. I, like you, prefer our ad or advert but I'm afraid it's pretty much gone in formal or media usage. :(

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Paul Wimsett

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 5:39pm
  • Folkestone, United Kingdom
  • 3,394 posts
Quote: Lazzard @ 12th October 2017, 3:33 PM It can only possibly appeal to 'Luvvies'

Luvvies are actors. Literati is probably the pretentious term you are after.

So people like Ed Reardon. It's not unusual.

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Alfred J Kipper

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 5:45pm
  • Aldershot, England
  • 6,358 posts

I resisted but now wish I hadn't. Rolling eyes

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Tom Jones

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 6:17pm
  • United Kingdom
  • 5 posts
Quote: Alfred J Kipper @ 12th October 2017, 5:36 PM Do you watch commercial TV Tom? ie. any other channel than BBC. They say 'commercial break' every 15 mins. I, like you, prefer our ad or advert but I'm afraid it's pretty much gone in formal or media usage. :(

Actually you've got me there. I don't watch much TV these days...
But I do listen to people talk :-) I do not feel this about any other TV or radio show and I certainly have nothing against US English. I just find it odd and distracting in ERW, and can't imagine who it appeals to. I would not expect an American show to be filled with Englishisms (if such a word exists :-)

(Jas spends time in Hollywood incidentally.)

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Paul Wimsett

  • Thursday 12th October 2017, 6:24pm
  • Folkestone, United Kingdom
  • 3,394 posts
Quote: Alfred J Kipper @ 12th October 2017, 5:45 PM I resisted but now wish I hadn't. Rolling eyes

I don't know what you mean.Angelic