Help in remembering Page 2

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A Horseradish

  • Monday 5th August 2013, 8:13am [Edited]
  • United Kingdom
  • 7,623 posts
Quote: Redleg @ August 4 2013, 9:36 PM BST

Hi Aaron, can not remember, but then again I can't remember if the TV set was B&W or colour...go figure. Hi horseradish, it was TV


The only other thing I recall is a serious documentary. Long before the M25 was built, it was proposed to have a series of motorway rings in and around London. The inner ring was near the centre. Construction started in the 1960s but only one small section was ever completed.

From the start, the project faced huge opposition from residents. The documentary showed original footage of their campaign. While they were about as serious as anyone could be, what emerged was that many were "characters". So there was a lot of humour to it as well as gloom.

I probably saw the footage in the following BBC4 series produced in the last decade. Clearly, though, much of it was taken from various programmes that were made at the time:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b007xr62

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Agnes Guano

  • Monday 5th August 2013, 10:10am
  • Tediumcester, England
  • 541 posts

While we're on the subject of pointless roads, I am a big fan of the site Pathetic Motorways. There have been some incredibly stupid road schemes attempted and half built over the years, the London inner ring roads being just one: http://pathetic.org.uk/

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Aaron

  • Monday 5th August 2013, 1:17pm
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,744 posts
Quote: Agnes Guano @ August 5 2013, 10:10 AM BST

While we're on the subject of pointless roads, I am a big fan of the site Pathetic Motorways. There have been some incredibly stupid road schemes attempted and half built over the years, the London inner ring roads being just one: http://pathetic.org.uk/

:D Brilliant. I love the internet.

Quote: Redleg @ August 4 2013, 9:36 PM BST

Hi Aaron, can not remember, but then again I can't remember if the TV set was B&W or colour...go figure.


Hmmm. You're certain it's a British show though? Couldn't perhaps have been Irish, or Australian, for example?

Could you contact your PBS station and see if they'd be able to offer any assistance on what programmes they were broadcasting back then?

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Dice

  • Monday 5th August 2013, 2:45pm [Edited]
  • United States
  • 162 posts

The house without the wall sounds a bit like Shine On Harvey Moon, but that's the only part that sounds like it! Also the correct time frame since it aired from 82-85.

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Redleg

  • Tuesday 6th August 2013, 5:36am [Edited]
  • United States
  • 10 posts

Hi Horseradish, no it was a sitcom, unless the doc you speak of had a laugh track!

Hi Agnes, ring roads, especially around big cities, sure can make getting from here to there less stressful. They had just begun a ring highway around Phoenix, AZ when I left in 2002 and when I went back several years ago to visit the kids it sure was a great help in getting around.

Aaron, The only thing I am sure of is it was on the TV! You got me looking at US programming from back then and there was nothing close to what I remember, but thank you for jogging my memory looking at the programming back then. The programming from back then makes the stuff of today look like crap. I watch little TV any more, and the commercials... I would swear they were made by 5 year old kids. Now I did send off an email to the PBS station in Ca. where I was at the time of the viewing asking for a list of British serial comedies. Will see if they feel like helping.

Hello Dice I went to YouTube and watch a bit of Shine On Harvey Moon, but it did seem to be in the 40s, and the programme I was watching was in the 70s or 80s time frame.

You know, having only seen it 2 or 3 times, I do not have much to go on as far as details. Finding this programme is like someone telling me: there is a ball in Europe, not sure of the size, but it has a green spot, and it will bounce nicely. Ah it's the little things in life that really make it worth living.

Some good news, got my box set of Waiting For God today, so will be able to ease my mind a bit. Just finished Bottom, and have started The Young Ones!

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A Horseradish

  • Tuesday 6th August 2013, 1:44pm [Edited]
  • United Kingdom
  • 7,623 posts
Quote: Redleg @ August 6 2013, 5:36 AM BST

Hi Horseradish, no it was a sitcom, unless the doc you speak of had a laugh track!


No, sorry Redleg, it didn't have a laugh track. I hope someone can find the answer for you.

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Redleg

  • Tuesday 6th August 2013, 4:01pm
  • United States
  • 10 posts

Well I got a reply back from the PBS station this morning... "Our current database only goes back to the mid-1990s, as the computer previous to this one died around then. But if you can describe the series a bit, I might be able to bounce it off a couple people, see if anyone can come up with a name".

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zooo

  • Tuesday 6th August 2013, 7:14pm
  • United Kingdom
  • 69,201 posts
Quote: Redleg @ August 6 2013, 4:01 PM BST

Our current database only goes back to the mid-1990s, as the computer previous to this one died around then.


Ha! Poor computer.

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Gordon Bennett

  • Tuesday 6th August 2013, 10:26pm
  • Basel, Switzerland
  • 19,199 posts
Quote: Redleg @ August 6 2013, 4:01 PM BST

But if you can describe the series a bit, I might be able to bounce it off a couple people, see if anyone can come up with a name".


Nice man.

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GallonOfAlan

  • Friday 18th October 2013, 1:57pm
  • Ireland
  • 114 posts

Thread resurrect!

Could it a Children's Film Foundation film "Ghost Of A Chance?"

From the TV Cream website (http://www.tvcream.co.uk/?cat=3560)

"GHOST OF A CHANCE (1968) Kindly old ghosts living in an old mansion that The Kids frequent enlist their help (there's a lot of this sort of thing) when The Council plan to tear down the house to build some child-unfriendly municipal construction. In the finale, the ghosts do all sorts of scary things to those dozy bowler-hatted council henchmen, resulting in humiliation for those nasty old grown-ups and victory for loon-panted kids and members of the undead alike. Hence the recently-born and the long-deceased come together to defeat the tyranny of late middle-age! The archetypal CFF fantasy adventure in so many ways, this set the template for a decade of low-budget Brit whimsy where the wonders of an unsullied juvenile imagination vanquished the humdrum realities of council-oppressed everyday life at a stroke. If only it were real, eh kids? The Ghosts: Jimmy Edwards, Bernard Cribbins, Patricia Hayes. The Council: Ronnie Barker, Terry Scott. The kids: ah, who cares?"