British Comedy Guide

Worst autobiography Page 2

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Agnes Guano

  • Wednesday 23rd November 2011, 9:29pm [Edited]
  • Tediumcester, England
  • 535 posts
Quote: Kidda @ November 23 2011, 9:08 PM GMT

It's not all bad though. Dave Gorman, Danny Wallace, Shane Richie (yes really) and a few choice others have written some cracking books.

I too will vouch for 'Rags to Richie' being a good read. There I said it.

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youngian

  • Wednesday 23rd November 2011, 9:40pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 1727 posts
Quote: Kidda @ November 23 2011, 9:08 PM GMT

Shane Richie (yes really)

Biographies do throw up surprises. A friend was praising Paul O'Grady's biog and he is in no way a fan of daytime TV celebs.

Footballers' biographies are usually a cure for insomnia but I enjoyed Tony Adam's Addicted which is a great fall and rise fable. Although nowhere not as good as chess grandmaster John Healy's Grass Arena.

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Stephen Goodlad

  • Thursday 24th November 2011, 9:23am
  • Mirfield, England
  • 1939 posts

Freddie Star's book bored the pants off me. It was full of awful puns that were not close to being funny (but I think he thought they were)

Ronnie Barker hated being thought of as a comic actor and writer. It was a little beneath him. He was a Shakesperian actor, classically trained don't ya know - and boy does he mention it a few times.

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SSTT

  • Thursday 24th November 2011, 9:53am [Edited]
  • Southampton, England
  • 1418 posts
Quote: Agnes Guano @ November 22 2011, 11:19 PM GMT

.. would make a paving slab want to take its own life.

Good line..

Ever thought of writing an autobiography?

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Agnes Guano

  • Thursday 24th November 2011, 10:19am
  • Tediumcester, England
  • 535 posts
Quote: Stylee TingTing @ November 24 2011, 9:53 AM GMT

Good line..

Ever thought of writing an autobiography?

I think it would descend into a long bitter diatribe of spittle and venom, much like Father Ted's Golden Cleric acceptance speech.

Paul O'Grady's first autobiography 'At My Mother's Knee and other low joints' is a very good read. He definitely has a comic touch and there are many astute observations and comments delivered in his wry acidic way. I haven't read the second volume yet.

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Agnes Guano

  • Thursday 24th November 2011, 10:20am
  • Tediumcester, England
  • 535 posts

Ronnie Barker's 'Dancing in the Moonlight' had a certain charm I thought. Whimsical and wistful but yes, not heavy on the comedy and it does finish way before the Ronnies years.

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Hercules Grytpype Thynne

  • Tuesday 20th March 2012, 5:44pm
  • England
  • 11471 posts

Just finished reading "Godfrey's Ghost: From Father to Son" by Nicolas Ridley.

Oh dear, very disappointing. To save me typing it again, here's what I said about it on another site:-

I suppose I was expecting a biog of Arnold Ridley and cannot see why his son could not have used Arnold's own aborted attempt, known as "The Book" and filled in the gaps with more interviews with people who would have known him such as Clive Dunn, Ian Lavender and Pamela Cundell who are all still alive but seemingly not consulted.
It was like trying to pick out bits of meat amongst the bones of his son's life - a life I had little or no interest at all, or in this missive to his own son (Arnold's grandson), which was even less interesting.

As a work in Father/Son relationships it was OK, but not what I was looking for leaving me not knowing much more about Arnold Ridley than before I started.

And why was the film of "The Ghost Train" not mentioned once?

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Markaroni

  • Tuesday 20th March 2012, 6:10pm
  • Edinburgh, Scotland
  • 98 posts

Picked up Jimmy Jones' book Now THIS Is A True Story in Poundland.

If you didn't already know he was rich he lets you know in his book, at least twice in every chapter.
Mentions plenty of his celebrity fans and has a good go at Mike Reid who apparently stole his material and the role of Franke Butcher in Eastenders.

Wasn't worth the £1

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David Carmon

  • Monday 18th June 2012, 10:59am
  • Removed for privacy, England
  • 2023 posts

Worst one I tried to read was Goldie Hawns, I couldn't get more than 5 pages in.

I was surprised to find I enjoyed Julian Clary's autobiography, Made me like him more.

Some good ones

Joan Sims - High Spirits
Amanda Barrie - It's Not A Rehearsal
Joanna Lumley
Jo Brand's TWO autobiographies!
Dawn French - Dear Fatty - I liked it, but it wasn't what I expected
Kenneth Williams Diaries
Cliff Richard (Yes really)
Julie Walters
Geri Halliwell

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Ignatius Rake

  • Tuesday 3rd July 2012, 8:10pm [Edited]
  • Djibouti
  • 863 posts
Quote: Markaroni @ March 20 2012, 6:10 PM GMT

Picked up Jimmy Jones' book Now THIS Is A True Story in Poundland.

If you didn't already know he was rich he lets you know in his book, at least twice in every chapter.
Mentions plenty of his celebrity fans and has a good go at Mike Reid who apparently stole his material and the role of Franke Butcher in Eastenders.

Wasn't worth the £1

I read Mike Reid's autobiography a few years ago for a very similar reason. Actually it's not too bad in a red masthead tabloid kinda way. It's like reading a very long sun exclusive.

While he didn't go on about his wealth as far as I can recall, he did go on about what a swordsman he was. Reckoned he lost his virginity at 11. Consensually to a woman as well. Maybe he did but my chin still feels itchy.

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dellas

  • Tuesday 3rd July 2012, 9:16pm
  • Manchester, England
  • 4598 posts

Smilie Great idea for thread, I've not finished Kenneth Williams yet it's too heavy! and not got far with Peter Kay, boring.

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Will Cam

  • Tuesday 3rd July 2012, 10:08pm
  • England
  • 6736 posts
Quote: dellas @ July 3 2012, 9:16 PM BST

Smilie Great idea for thread, I've not finished Kenneth Williams yet it's too heavy! and not got far with Peter Kay, boring.

Boring!

Bor-ing?

I laughed out loud like a twat and couldn't put it down.

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sootyj

  • Wednesday 4th July 2012, 11:35am
  • England
  • 51287 posts

Garlic read?

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