Comedy you want to like, but don't Page 10

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AJGO

  • Wednesday 10th August 2011, 8:35am
  • London, England
  • 4,987 posts
Quote: David Carmon @ August 9 2011, 11:57 PM BST

As it sounds.

For example, I hate mushroom soup as it knocks me sick when I eat it.

Describes something you don't like or feel revulsion at etc.


Anything to do with phrase 'knocked me for six'? Or completely different etymology?

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Michael in London

  • Wednesday 10th August 2011, 1:14pm
  • London, United Kingdom
  • 78 posts
Quote: Dr Sanchez @ July 30 2011, 6:29 PM BST

If you're not into gaming and obscure comics then the film will be lost on you.


I am not even into unobscure comics, nor gaming, but I loved the Scott Pilgrim film. You do not need the details to get the gist, and I was swimming in gist.

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sidecar jon

  • Wednesday 10th August 2011, 7:27pm
  • 259 posts
Quote: sitcomgeek @ August 9 2011, 10:52 PM BST


And one more. Heresy. Total heresy. Hitchhikers. There. I've said it. Love the idea. Love bits of it, moments and jokes. Appreciate how important it has been - and I've been very influenced by it, and comedians who were influenced by it. Red Dwarf wouldn't exist without it. But I haven't heard the radio shows all the way through, and don't really want to go back and and finish them. And got bored of the books half way through the second, since every character seems to talk the same (like they do in a Tibor Fischer novel. (anyone? Is this on? Hello??))


For me it was a gradual thing, I heard the radio shows read the books then just slowly got sick of it. Sick of its smarm and "wit" the rythm the cutestyness
and everything about it..

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swerytd

  • Thursday 11th August 2011, 3:10pm [Edited]
  • Guildford, England
  • 7,524 posts
Quote: sitcomgeek @ August 9 2011, 10:52 PM BST


And one more. Heresy. Total heresy. Hitchhikers. There. I've said it. Love the idea. Love bits of it, moments and jokes. Appreciate how important it has been - and I've been very influenced by it, and comedians who were influenced by it. Red Dwarf wouldn't exist without it. But I haven't heard the radio shows all the way through, and don't really want to go back and and finish them. And got bored of the books half way through the second, since every character seems to talk the same (like they do in a Tibor Fischer novel. (anyone? Is this on? Hello??))

I know. Cast me out. Look away. I'm hideous.


Totally agree with you. Thought the best of the trilogy was the fifth(!) book, Mostly Harmless, that I believe started out as a Dirk Gently novel. This kind of makes sense as I much preferred those novels over Hitchhikers.

I had similar thoughts re: Vic'n'Bob too. Found them very funny in interviews when they were 'off the cuff', so to speak which led me to believe they got less and less funny the more they scripted stuff.

Then I watched Catterick and thought it brilliant.

Dan

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Kaytee

  • Friday 19th August 2011, 12:46pm
  • England
  • 56 posts

Drop the Dead Donkey. It seemed like everyone was saying it was so clever and innovative, but I didn't find it funny.

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Snork

  • Thursday 1st September 2011, 10:08pm [Edited]
  • In a very weird world, monsieur, England
  • 90 posts

I don't really want to like anything. I either like it or don't. At the moment I'm mainly watching 2 sitcoms: Miranda and Not Going Out.

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Yorick

  • Friday 2nd September 2011, 2:54am [Edited]
  • Rochester, England
  • 29 posts

Just a word in defence of The Goon Show. I listened to it as a child and it was the funniest, most innovative show of the 50s. But a lot of it was "topical humour" which is lost to listeners now. This surreal humour was new. The idea of two men in a rocket putting out the Sun with buckets of water or a crook setting the English Channel alight to claim the insurance seemed mind-boggling funny then.
Nothing rude was allowed on the BBC. But they'd sneak in a character called Hugh Jampton. Or an effeminate man living in Fairy-cake Lane.
Have you heard the dialogue where Bluebottle (a boy scout) asks Eccles the time and Eccles says he's got it written on a piece of paper. "It's half past eight." That morning he'd asked a man what the time was and the man wrote it down, in case anyone asked Eccles later on, he could tell them the time. But what if someone asks the time and it isn't half past eight? Eccles says "In that case, I don't tell 'em!"
That's got to be even more surreal than Reeves and Mortimer.

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SSTT

  • Thursday 6th October 2011, 5:28pm
  • Southampton, England
  • 1,548 posts
Quote: AJGO @ August 10 2011, 8:35 AM BST

Anything to do with phrase 'knocked me for six'? Or completely different etymology?


What the hell have insects got to do with it?

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Kidda

  • Saturday 8th October 2011, 7:41pm [Edited]
  • Birmingham, England
  • 92 posts

The IT Crowd for me too, Moss's voice makes me feel violent. ugh

Not Going Out doesn't float my boat either, I like Lee Mack as a comedian but his delivery is more suited to stand-up than a sitcom.

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Mrs Pike

  • Saturday 8th October 2011, 9:24pm
  • England
  • 7 posts

Green Wing for me. There are bits of it I like and find very funny but overall it's just a bit bizarre. Sometimes it seemed like it was trying too hard and not quite getting there.

Also with people on the IT Crowd.

My Family I just find awful now. I liked it a bit when I was a kid but now I just find it stilted, wooden and crap jokes.

There was a show recently with Lyndhurst in it (can't quite remember the name), that was bloody awful too.

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Lee Henman

  • Sunday 9th October 2011, 1:27am
  • England
  • 5,183 posts

Most of Monty Python. It's an ocean of shit with a few golden nuggets of comedy sweetcorn. I know I'm supposed to love and respect it but I just don't. Same goes for Peter Cook. To me, Dudley was much funnier. And Spike Milligan always left me cold. God, what am I saying... *hides for fear of being lynched*.

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Aaron

  • Sunday 9th October 2011, 1:29am
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,345 posts

I largely agree. I'm not overly familiar with much of their work, but what I've seen has never grabbed me. They're not names that put a smile on my face in the way Eric Morecambe or Terry Scott do.

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Lee Henman

  • Sunday 9th October 2011, 1:32am
  • England
  • 5,183 posts
Quote: Aaron @ July 30 2011, 12:25 AM BST

Not heard that term before! What does it mean?

It just means "Makes me sick". I thought it was just a Teesside expression, like "It makes me bork".