BBC Radio shows which became ITV shows

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Tim Azure

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 10:43am [Edited]
  • Kent, England
  • 2,037 posts

These are few in number but it does happen, for example Ladies of Letters, Dead Ringers was adapted to 2DTV (the BBC TV version of Dead Ringers missed a lot of the characters such as those from EastEnders and changed the spoof phone calls to other wind-ups), Hello Cheeky in 1976 became a Yorkshire Television show.

Any more examples?

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James Cotter

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 11:34am
  • Exeter, England
  • 1,590 posts

After Henry written by Simon Brett and starring the wonderful Prunella Scales started on BBC Radio 4 and moved to ITV and attracted over 14 million viewers, bit of a cock up from the BBC.

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swerytd

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 12:44pm
  • Guildford, England
  • 7,522 posts

Ade Edmondson/Nigel Smith's Teenage Kicks. BBC Radio 2 (I believe) to ITV1.

Going the other way (sort of) and, quite bizarre and unique in my experience, White Van Man's last credit screen says 'ITV Productions for BBC TV'!

Dan

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john lucas 101

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 2:00pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 7,098 posts

I have a vague memory of Just a Minute having a TV version, maybe in the 90s on ITV. Don't think it lasted very long.

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James Cotter

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 2:09pm [Edited]
  • Exeter, England
  • 1,590 posts
Quote: john lucas 101 @ April 12 2011, 2:00 PM BST

I have a vague memory of Just a Minute having a TV version, maybe in the 90s on ITV. Don't think it lasted very long.


Yeah you're right; in 1994 and 1995.

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john lucas 101

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 2:11pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 7,098 posts
Quote: James Cotter @ April 12 2011, 2:09 PM BST

Yeah you're right; in 1994 and 1995.


Oh. I didn't have a televison then. I wonder how I saw it? Perhaps I had a friend with one.

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Blenkinsop

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 4:09pm
  • England
  • 2,013 posts

I suppose Hancock sort of fits here for although all his classic stuff was under the wing of the BBC, didn't he finally cross to the 'other side', and like so many others who did that I seem to remember no good came of it. Not 100% clear in my recollections here and am open to correction.

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James Cotter

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 4:19pm
  • Exeter, England
  • 1,590 posts
Quote: Blenkinsop @ April 12 2011, 4:09 PM BST

I suppose Hancock sort of fits here for although all his classic stuff was under the wing of the BBC, didn't he finally cross to the 'other side', and like so many others who did that I seem to remember no good came of it. Not 100% clear in my recollections here and am open to correction.


Yes he did a series called Hancock for ATV in 1963.

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Marc P

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 4:21pm
  • England
  • 17,698 posts

Partridge started on radio.

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Russell Hughes

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 4:45pm
  • Birkenhead, England
  • 10 posts
Quote: Marc P @ April 12 2011, 4:21 PM BST

Partridge started on radio.


But didn't become an ITV show though, surely?

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Blenkinsop

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 4:52pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 2,013 posts
Quote: Russell Hughes @ April 12 2011, 4:45 PM BST

But didn't become an ITV show though, surely?


No very true, but I know that the fabbo Mid Morning Matters made for t'Internet has been bought by a broadcaster for TV transmission. I hope it's the Beeb but I think I picked up somewhere that it may be a commercial one.

I always hate when Beeb shows, made without having to nod to ad breaks, are subsequently stuck on a satellite channel with jeffing ads. The cuts leading to these breaks are frequently of the sledgehammer-subtle-as-a-brick-in-the-head variety.

Ah-ha!

Quote: Mark @ March 6 2011, 2:05 PM BST

The 12 episodes will be edited into a 6-part TV series. A broadcaster has now apparently purchased the rights... although I've yet to manage to ascertain which channel it is.

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lofthouse

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 6:52pm
  • Nowhere, England
  • 8,973 posts

Morecambe and Wise were on the radio and ITV

does that count?!

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Aaron

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 8:56pm [Edited]
  • Royal Berkshire, England
  • 68,311 posts
Quote: swerytd @ April 12 2011, 12:44 PM BST

Going the other way (sort of) and, quite bizarre and unique in my experience, White Van Man's last credit screen says 'ITV Productions for BBC TV'!

Dan


Never seen The Royle Family?

Quote: Blenkinsop @ April 12 2011, 4:09 PM BST

I suppose Hancock sort of fits here for although all his classic stuff was under the wing of the BBC, didn't he finally cross to the 'other side', and like so many others who did that I seem to remember no good came of it. Not 100% clear in my recollections here and am open to correction.


Well, sort of. After the BBC Hancock series ended, he made some shows for ITV. But they weren't transfers of BBC radio programmes, which is what this thread is asking about!

(Incidentally, Hancock's first TV series - before Hacock's Half Hour itself transferred - was for ITV.)

Quote: Blenkinsop @ April 12 2011, 4:52 PM BST

No very true, but I know that the fabbo Mid Morning Matters made for t'Internet has been bought by a broadcaster for TV transmission. I hope it's the Beeb but I think I picked up somewhere that it may be a commercial one.


Channel 4, IIRC.

I submit: Second Thoughts.

And of course Dad's Army spin-off It Sticks Out Half A Mile to High & Dry.

And to diverge from the topic slightly, Whose Line Is It Anyway? went to Channel 4.

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lofthouse

  • Tuesday 12th April 2011, 10:52pm [Edited]
  • Nowhere, England
  • 8,973 posts

I think the BBC turned down WLIIA? before Channel 4 took it.

Can't blame them really - the radio shows were fairly dreadful. Full of comedians, not improvisers.

Lenny Henry was woeful.