Why do Comedians become straight actors? Page 2

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chipolata

  • Wednesday 16th March 2011, 6:47pm
  • England
  • 29,718 posts

Steve Martin is pretty good playing an oily conman in The Spanish Prisoner.

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Dicksplash

  • Wednesday 16th March 2011, 7:09pm [Edited]
  • Sussex, England
  • 87 posts
Quote: chipolata @ March 16 2011, 6:47 PM GMT

Steve Martin is pretty good playing an oily conman in The Spanish Prisoner.


Brilliant in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, I won't mention Sgt.Bilko other than he never stood a chance.

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chipolata

  • Wednesday 16th March 2011, 7:20pm
  • England
  • 29,718 posts

Martin was brilliantly funny when younger. But that seems a long time ago now.

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Matthew Stott

  • Wednesday 16th March 2011, 7:33pm [Edited]
  • Yemen
  • 19,296 posts
Quote: chipolata @ March 16 2011, 7:20 PM GMT

Martin was brilliantly funny when younger. But that seems a long time ago now.


You get the feeling he doesn't care anymore, really; just doing it for the cash. Must be something like that, surely? There's no way anyone who was really trying could say yes to that many terrible films! His novels are still good, though.

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Chappers

  • Wednesday 16th March 2011, 9:59pm
  • Surreyish., England
  • 30,449 posts

Like Loopy says - for the money - and like zooo says - why not have a second string?

I'm looking for just one career.

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Steve Sunshine

  • Wednesday 16th March 2011, 10:12pm [Edited]
  • Dagenham, England
  • 14,533 posts

I think good comedians can make good actors and good actors can be good in comedic roles.
It's all performance isn't it.

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chipolata

  • Wednesday 16th March 2011, 10:18pm
  • England
  • 29,718 posts
Quote: Steve Sunshine @ March 16 2011, 10:12 PM GMT

I think good comedians can make good actors and good actors can be good in comedic roles.

Thank you, Kofi Annan. ;)

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Dicksplash

  • Wednesday 16th March 2011, 10:22pm
  • Sussex, England
  • 87 posts

I think if they have the second string it usually means they are no longer confident or at the top of their game, Ive not forgiven Lee Evans accent in 'Something about Mary' I accept he was young and the door to Hollywood opened, I think he went up his own backside for a bit but his always been a comedian first and foremost and has a new DVD out soon, so far ive not been convinced by any of them trying to make the cross over into mainstream acting, I know Bradley Walsh is convincing some people and I would probably give him a fair go if he dropped the 'Odd One Out' show .

On a separate note, Matt Dillon stole the film 'Something about Mary'

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AngieBaby

  • Wednesday 16th March 2011, 10:36pm
  • England
  • 3,247 posts

I reckon, most comedians just want to be famous. They realise they aren't good looking enough to be movie stars, nor talented enough to be musicians, but they can make some people laugh.

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chipolata

  • Wednesday 16th March 2011, 11:23pm
  • England
  • 29,718 posts

One of the weirdest transitions to straight acting was Vincent Price, who actually began in comedy. Conversely the brilliant Walter Mathau started straight and went comic.

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Badge

  • Wednesday 16th March 2011, 11:43pm
  • London, England
  • 9,490 posts

"For money"? Sometimes, maybe. But I think it's more complicated than that and in some cases money almost certainly has nothing to do with it.

For some I suspect it is an issue of age, experience, stretching themselves, doing something different - any or all of these. And the best examples are actually really good actors; the worst examples really don't last that long, so it isn't a problem. The mediocre are mediocre anyway so who cares that they used to be a known as a comedian?

Also as Nat says, they are used to performing and reacting to audiences so they are likely to be better at acting than the average Joe walking off the street.

Finally, they can be a decent bit of publicity for a show - a bit of celebrity casting rarely does a show much harm (see for example Paul Gadd's run as the genie in Aladdin).

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Oldrocker

  • Thursday 17th March 2011, 12:27am
  • Near my beloved Black Country in Wolverhampton, England
  • 13,416 posts
Quote: chipolata @ March 16 2011, 11:23 PM GMT

One of the weirdest transitions to straight acting was Vincent Price, who actually began in comedy.


'The Masque of the Red Death' ?

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Rico El Vista

  • Thursday 17th March 2011, 4:48pm
  • Scotland
  • 139 posts
Quote: AngieBaby @ March 16 2011, 10:36 PM GMT

I reckon, most comedians just want to be famous. They realise they aren't good looking enough to be movie stars, nor talented enough to be musicians, but they can make some people laugh.


Ugly b******s can still become film stars, though, Angie.

Karl Malden, Jeff Goldblum, Richard Gere, Ernest Borgine, Mickey Rourke, and Ray Winstone among many others all done OK for themselves, despite being no oil paintings.

The Hollywood 'Glamour Machine' simply hypes a lot of average-looking [or worse] folks using professional stylists, top photographers, CGI airbrushing on film posters, etc.

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zooo

  • Thursday 17th March 2011, 4:49pm [Edited]
  • United Kingdom
  • 69,187 posts

Jeff Goldblum's not ugly! Nor is Richard Gere - he's very classically handsome.

But yes, fair point in general.

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Matthew Stott

  • Thursday 17th March 2011, 4:55pm
  • Yemen
  • 19,296 posts
Quote: Rico El Vista @ March 17 2011, 4:48 PM GMT

Ugly b******s can still become film stars, though, Angie.

Mickey Rourke,

?

His face may be f**ked now, due to boxing and surgery, but when Rourke became a film star, in the eighties, he was very handsome indeed.