Things that piss you off Page 1771

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lofthouse

  • Wednesday 2nd October 2019, 9:15pm
  • Nowhere, England
  • 9,725 posts

I remember about ten years ago spinning through the dial on my FM radio and finding that at a certain frequency I could hear what was going on in someone's living room. Must have been somewhere local to me I'm guessing

The only explanation I could come up with was that the police were bugging the place and I was listening in on the same frequency or something

This went on for about 3 or 4 days

Crazy shit

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Definitely Tarby

  • Wednesday 2nd October 2019, 9:23pm [Edited]
  • 2,019 posts

Why is stuff like that such compulsive listening? Reminds me of when I would pick up the handset to make a call and there would be two people chatting away. It didn't matter what they were talking about if you were quick enough to hit the mute button you could listen to their banal conversation for a few minutes before getting bored and hanging up. If they heard a click it would result in...

"I think this is a crossed line, I'll call back"

Good old days.

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Briosaid

  • Wednesday 2nd October 2019, 10:19pm [Edited]
  • 1,356 posts
Quote: Rood Eye @ 2nd October 2019, 8:58 PM

Bloody hell, lofty! You think you've got problems?

There are people here who can remember looking forward to spending an hour every Sunday night with one ear pressed hard against their radio speaker so they could hear "The Top 20" on Radio Luxembourg.

That was just about the only pop music anybody in Britain ever heard on radio in those days.

Not only was the sound continually fluctuating between fairly quiet and non-existent, but you missed a lot of the music while you had your head away from the radio asking your family politely to shut the f*** up!

Laughing out loud

YES! I remember, as a child, Radio Lexembourg - and was Perry Mason on that?

"Half past nine, time for Perry Mason."

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Rood Eye

  • Wednesday 2nd October 2019, 10:41pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 4,103 posts
Quote: Briosaid @ 2nd October 2019, 10:19 PM

YES! I remember, as a child, Radio Luxembourg - and was Perry Mason on that?

"Half-past nine, time for Perry Mason."

Yes, every weekday night at 9:30 PM was time for Perry Mason.

And who will ever forget Horace Batchelor and his famous "Infra-Draw Method"" for winning the football pools?

I'm sure Horace used to run the business from his kitchen table in Keynsham which, as we all know was "spelt K E Y N S H A M".

Before the advent of pirate radio and later BBC Radio 1, Radio Luxembourg was a distant dazzling display in a dull, drab, dismal and usually drizzling dump called "Britain".

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Briosaid

  • Wednesday 2nd October 2019, 11:00pm
  • 1,356 posts

Oh, the memories! After Perry Mason, I was put to bed in a bed chair in the single end. Happy days when I didn't know I was poor.

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john tregorran

  • Thursday 3rd October 2019, 1:43am
  • mornington,victoria, Australia
  • 1,397 posts

And Dan Dare.
I'm sure he was on 208 ,not Radio3 anyway.

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Rood Eye

  • Friday 4th October 2019, 8:43pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 4,103 posts
Quote: john tregorran @ 3rd October 2019, 1:43 AM

And Dan Dare.
I'm sure he was on 208.

Yes, Dan Dare "pilot of the future" was on Radio Luxembourg every night of the week in the early/mid 1950s.

He first appeared in the Eagle comic which was probably the first respectable not-for-kiddies comic to be published in Britain.

Before the advent of the Eagle, there were the Beano and the Dandy of course but comics featuring more-grown-up storylines had a dreadful reputation in respectable British society mainly due to the popularity of Victorian "penny dreadfuls" that depicted all manner of adult activity.

Well, not quite all manner of adult activity but certainly the most astonishing amounts of crime and violence!

The Eagle's big selling point when it came to getting past the ever-vigilant eyes of respectable British parents was that it was founded by a clergyman. I mean, you can't ask for a better reference than that!

Strangely, Dan Dare's adventures in outer space were set in the late 1990s. I'm sure that sort of stuff looked all too probable in the early 50s.

Sadly, however, they didn't quite get it right.

Nevertheless, it was thrilling stuff in its day.

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john tregorran

  • Friday 4th October 2019, 9:10pm
  • mornington,victoria, Australia
  • 1,397 posts

Journey into Space on the radio was set in the 60's. :)

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Briosaid

  • Friday 4th October 2019, 9:18pm
  • 1,356 posts

Old bastards who insist on putting their messages on the belt before I've emptied my trolley onto it. I've already had a few confrontations about this (which I won, by the way). Tell me why it's always bloody men who do this? Are they blind, thick, or bad mannered?

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Rood Eye

  • Friday 4th October 2019, 9:19pm [Edited]
  • England
  • 4,103 posts
Quote: john tregorran @ 4th October 2019, 9:10 PM

Journey into Space on the radio was set in the 60's. :)

Yes, and the second series featured a manned flight to the moon set in 1971.

That's certainly one bit of science fiction that was commendably close to science fact.

PS: that's assuming the Americans did actually . . . well, let's not get into that again. Laughing out loud

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Chappers

  • Friday 4th October 2019, 11:04pm
  • Surreyish., England
  • 31,148 posts
Quote: Rood Eye @ 2nd October 2019, 8:58 PM

Bloody hell, lofty! You think you've got problems?

There are people here who can remember looking forward to spending an hour every Sunday night with one ear pressed hard against their radio speaker so they could hear "The Top 20" on Radio Luxembourg.

That was just about the only pop music anybody in Britain ever heard on radio in those days.

Not only was the sound continually fluctuating between fairly quiet and non-existent, but you missed a lot of the music while you had your head away from the radio asking your family politely to shut the f*** up!

Laughing out loud

I'd be listening in bed and fall asleep while it was on and wear the batteries down.

Quote: Rood Eye @ 4th October 2019, 8:43 PM

Yes, Dan Dare "pilot of the future" was on Radio Luxembourg every night of the week in the early/mid 1950s.

He first appeared in the Eagle comic which was probably the first respectable not-for-kiddies comic to be published in Britain.

Before the advent of the Eagle, there were the Beano and the Dandy of course but comics featuring more-grown-up storylines had a dreadful reputation in respectable British society mainly due to the popularity of Victorian "penny dreadfuls" that depicted all manner of adult activity.

Well, not quite all manner of adult activity but certainly the most astonishing amounts of crime and violence!

The Eagle's big selling point when it came to getting past the ever-vigilant eyes of respectable British parents was that it was founded by a clergyman. I mean, you can't ask for a better reference than that!

Strangely, Dan Dare's adventures in outer space were set in the late 1990s. I'm sure that sort of stuff looked all too probable in the early 50s.

Sadly, however, they didn't quite get it right.

Nevertheless, it was thrilling stuff in its day.

I'm too young to remember that but I had the Eaglefrom about 1964 for 4 or 5 years.

Quote: Briosaid @ 4th October 2019, 9:18 PM

Old bastards who insist on putting their messages on the belt before I've emptied my trolley onto it. I've already had a few confrontations about this (which I won, by the way). Tell me why it's always bloody men who do this? Are they blind, thick, or bad mannered?

Messages? What are you on about?

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Rood Eye

  • Friday 4th October 2019, 11:12pm
  • England
  • 4,103 posts
Quote: Chappers @ 4th October 2019, 11:04 PM

Messages? What are you on about?

Shopping!

Brio and I grew up more than 200 miles apart but I can remember people in Manchester saying "I've just got a few messages" when they meant "I've just got a bit of shopping to do".

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Briosaid

  • Friday 4th October 2019, 11:35pm
  • 1,356 posts
Quote: Rood Eye @ 4th October 2019, 11:12 PM

Shopping!

Brio and I grew up more than 200 miles apart but I can remember people in Manchester saying "I've just got a few messages" when they meant "I've just got a bit of shopping to do".

Thank you. The North of England has a lot in common with Scotland. When we're independent, they'll be welcome to join us. Laughing out loud

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Definitely Tarby

  • Saturday 5th October 2019, 12:02am [Edited]
  • 2,019 posts
Quote: Briosaid @ 4th October 2019, 9:18 PM

Old bastards who insist on putting their messages on the belt before I've emptied my trolley onto it. I've already had a few confrontations about this (which I won, by the way). Tell me why it's always bloody men who do this? Are they blind, thick, or bad mannered?

That pisses me off and as a mainly basket shopper it doesn't happen anymore but I have a flow chart for that situation when I'm emptying my trolley and the person behind me starts unloading prematurely. It can be avoided by keeping the trolley at the end of the belt to keep access blocked off but when it does happen:

Are they bigger and/or have a boxers nose? yes/no

yes: let it go, they are not worth it and could get seriously hurt

no: object to their actions with a dirty look or shake of the head

Do they apologise? yes/no

yes: nod in acknowledgement and silently celebrate the victory

no: are they elderly/disabled/infirm? yes/no

yes: Push their items back in a threatening manner and then slam the shopping separator down on the belt
no: are they male? yes/no
yes: let it go, they are not worth it and could get seriously hurt

no: push my items forward to give them more space

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Briosaid

  • Saturday 5th October 2019, 12:35am
  • 1,356 posts

My arse to some of that. Male or not, I don't let them away with it, mainly by shoving their stuff back up the belt and glaring at them. So far it's worked. ( I haven't played many a panto witch without having a bloody good glare. Laughing out loud)