QI - In The Press

A quietly intriguing column from the brains behind QI, the BBC quiz show. This week: QI takes it to the bridge.

Written by Anne Miller and John Mitchinson. The Daily Telegraph, 4th December 2013

The comedy quiz show QI has been delighting TV audiences for ten years with a cornucopia of off-the-wall facts. But the name of the BBC programme - based on the phrase Quite Interesting - doesn't do them justice, as this fascinating collection from a new book proves...

The Daily Mail, 2nd December 2013

QI loves to stray towards the saucepot at the best of times, let alone when the episode theme is "Kinky". So tonight's episode is not recommended for the prudish, covering as it does electrically assisted kissing, sex with pigeons and a boy who got a certain body part trapped between powerful magnets. And that's the stuff we can print.

At one point Fry uses super-saturated sodium acetate and exothermic nucleation (apparently) to make instant crystals into a rude shape, while Johnny Vegas sings the theme from The Snowman. It's one of the oddest sequences you'll see on television, ever. Also steering through the smut are Sandi Toksvig and Janet Street-Porter.

David Butcher, The Radio Times, 29th November 2013

A quietly intriguing column from the brains behind QI, the BBC quiz show. This week: QI salutes warlike women.

Written by Molly Oldfield & John Mitchinson. The Daily Telegraph, 27th November 2013

The TV quiz's top fact-checker reveals some of the favourite nuggets of information he uncovered for its latest publication.

Written by John Mitchinson. The Guardian, 20th November 2013

In an exclusive extract, the QI team present just a few of the jaw-dropping facts in their new book - in no particular order.

Written by John Lloyd, John Mitchinson and James Harkin. The Daily Telegraph, 13th November 2013

For an episode entitled Keeps, Stephen Fry introduces a one-off round called "Keep Still or Scarper", turning on whether it's safer to run away or freeze when confronted with certain wild animals. His demonstration of how to proceed if you bump into a pack of wolves (roaring like an angry Victorian gentleman, basically) makes you long to see the confrontation for real.

Elsewhere, there are insights into whether ants can hold their drink, the smile of a bowhead whale and a dispute between Fry and Bill Bailey about Welsh accents. Also adding to the fun - Sarah Millican and Jason Manford.

David Butcher, Radio Times, 8th November 2013

From the brains behind the BBC quiz show. This week: QI's on Broadway.

Written by Molly Oldfield and John Mitchinson. The Daily Telegraph, 6th November 2013

Poor, hapless Alan Davies is on the receiving end of a storm of QI klaxons as he good-naturedly lurches from one wrong answer to the next. But it's an honourable tradition and Davies is a willing fallguy - he even fails at a supposedly foolproof experiment involving a broom's centre of gravity.

Elsewhere, guests Danny Baker, Jo Brand and Marcus Brigstocke enjoy a bit of a jolly knockabout that's full of surprises and "well, I never knew that" sort of facts, including the answer to questions such as £what do mosquitos do in the rain?" and which country has the longest traffic jams. At one point it all becomes a bit much for Baker who wails, "On behalf of the audience I have to say, sometimes I hate this programme."

Alison Graham, Radio Times, 1st November 2013

From the brains behind the BBC quiz show. This week: QI is scandalicious.

Written by Molly Oldfield and John Mitchinson. The Daily Telegraph, 30th October 2013

James "Turbo" Harkin - QI's head elf - let's us in on the mysterious art of fact crafting...

Written by James Harkin. Waterstones, 24th October 2013

From the brains behind the BBC quiz show. This week, to mark Prince George's christening: [c]QI[/v gorges on Georges.

The Daily Telegraph, 23rd October 2013

In a series famous for facts, here's a killer one: of the things QI presented as true in its first series, 60 per cent are now thought untrue. Stephen Fry announces this near the start of a landmark (and very funny) edition where he explains "the half-life of facts" - scientists revising knowledge about how many moons the Earth has, for instance - and makes recompense for all the points that should have been awarded over the years for answers that have proved to be right, as a result of which Alan Davies is retrospectively awarded... 737 points.

Davies is on good comedy form, pretending to pluck the legs off a millipede or describing his stealthy mother-in-law. We also learn how the Romans avoided forgetting names and how 19th-century Germans realised birds fly south for the winter - a flabbergasting story.

David Butcher, Radio Times, 18th October 2013

So long has QI been going (a decade; we're now up to "K" in the alphabet) that some of the arcane facts presented in earlier seasons of the show (there's no way of knowing how old a lobster is) have since been disproved. That uncertainty forms the agreeable theme of tonight's show ("knowledge"). Here, the guests (Graham Linehan and Jo Brand) not only arrive circuitously at their answers, they also question their legitimacy. Incidentally, should you ever need to age a lobster, you cut off its eye stalks and count the rings.

John Robinson, The Guardian, 18th October 2013

A quietly intriguing column from the brains behind QI, the BBC quiz show. This week: QI on dolphins.

Written by Molly Oldfield and John Mitchinson. The Daily Telegraph, 16th October 2013

A quietly intriguing column from the brains behind QI, the BBC quiz show. This week: QI has a Danish.

Written by Molly Oldfield & John Mitchinson. The Daily Telegraph, 9th October 2013

Lloyd is mulling the potential for a stage version of QI.

Written by Susie Mesure. The Independent, 4th October 2013

A quietly intriguing column from the brains behind QI, the BBC quiz show. This week: QI is out of its tree.

Written by Molly Oldfield & John Mitchinson. The Daily Telegraph, 2nd October 2013

An intriguing column from the brains behind QI, the BBC quiz show. This week: QI gets into a crustacean situation.

Written by Anne Miller and John Mitchinson. The Daily Telegraph, 23rd September 2013

Look out for a revealing exchange tonight between Stephen Fry and Alan Davies, comedy's most unlikely double act. They're friends off-screen, and there's a lovely spat where Fry grumbles under his breath that Davies didn't invite him to his wedding. "I DID invite you but you didn't come!" Davies protests, and Fry has to bury his head in his hands in shame as Davies reminds him that it was filming an episode of Bones that kept him away.

Aside from these recriminations, it's the usual pattern of recent QI episodes: Fry answering his own questions at length while the panellists chuckle along. Along the way, there's a detour into bestiality, some amusing Korean sayings and the timeless line: "Are you ready for me to pump the custard?"

David Butcher, Radio Times, 20th September 2013

A quietly intriguing column from the brains behind QI, the BBC quiz show. This week: QI's all right now - in fact, it's a gas.

Written by Molly Oldfield & John Mitchinson. The Daily Telegraph, 16th September 2013

It's a round titled "Kit and Kaboodle" and Stephen Fry wants to know if there's a use for kitty-litter that doesn't involve cats. Alan Davies tries to be helpful, but his contribution ("In an episode of Jonathan Creek I weed into some cat litter") isn't quite what Fry is after. Ross Noble and Noel Fielding, with Australian comic Colin Lane, can't quite lift the episode off the ground.

But there are some bright bits, including Fry demonstrating martial arts on a pile of three bricks: "This takes extreme focus and extreme pain," says Fry, wincing in agony.

Alison Graham, Radio Times, 13th September 2013

You probably haven't heard of John Lloyd - but this self-described Stoic, whose career was derailed by depression, has probably made you laugh more times than anyone else.

Written by Helen Lewis. The New Statesman, 11th September 2013

In their 300th column for Weekend, the brains behind the BBC quiz show QI consider matters tercentenary.

Written by Molly Oldfield & John Mitchinson. The Daily Telegraph, 10th September 2013

There's bound to be ribaldry in an episode titled Knees and Knockers so lie down on your antique fainting couch right now as Stephen Fry and the teams get blushingly saucy. But it's all good fun and even educational. Come on, don't tell me you're not curious about where in the human body the "end-bulbs of Krause" are? Or the pores of Kohn? (Clue: it's not the title of a Star Trek movie.)

Elsewhere, David Mitchell has one of his Would I Lie To You?-type comic rants, this time about, of all things, the supposed idiocy of pandas. We learn why robins are associated with Christmas, the rules for the driving of cars in early 20th-century Pennsylvania and why red kites are called red kites, even though they aren't red.

Alison Graham, Radio Times, 6th September 2013

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