Limmy's Show!. Brian Limond. Image credit: The Comedy Unit.

Limmy's Show!

Internet sensation Limmy makes the jump to television in a sketch comedy series for BBC Scotland

AKA:
Limmy
Genre:
Sketch Show
Broadcast:
2009 - 2013  (BBC Two Scotland)
Episodes:
22 (pilot + 3 series)
Starring:
Brian Limond, Debbie Welsh, Tom Brogan, Raymond Mearns, Paul McCole, Kirstin McLean, Alan McHugh
Writers:
Brian Limond
Production:
The Comedy Unit

Limmy's Show! is an inventive comedy sketch series written, performed, directed and animated by "one of Scotland's most original comedy minds", Brian Limond, aka 'Limmy'.

Limmy plays a range of characters including hard bitten ex-junkie Jacquelline McCafferty, urban menace John-Paul, and deep thinker (and zoned-out waster) Dee Dee. Other characters include animated primary school power broker Wee Gary and adventure game phone-in host, Falconhoof.

Limmy also pops up regularly as himself too, making some extremely Limmy-like observations on life (e.g. pointing out the "twenty's plenty" speeding signs don't rhyme; and asking why some people insist on addressing groups of girls using phrases like "what would you guys like"?).

The sketches are inspired by the videos, virals and playthings from Limmy's website and his podcasts. Each 30 minute episode is distinctly 'Limmy' and combines character pieces, arresting inserts, diverting visuals, cutting observations and sketches.

Our Review: Following a successful pilot, the first series of this sketch show was broadcast on BBC Two Scotland in early 2010 and became a trending topic two weeks in a row on social network website Twitter. It earned praise from fans, not only in Scotland but all over the UK, including writer Graham Linehan, writer/performer Peter Serafinowicz, musician Calvin Harris and writer/performer Matt Lucas.

It's good to see BBC Scotland giving popular internet star Limmy another chance to air some of his sketches, thoughts and characters... however, Limmy's Show! is unlikely to become a big TV hit - we think this style of humour is probably too niche to cross over to a mainstream TV audience.